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Book Paris After the Liberation: 1944 - 1949

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Paris After the Liberation: 1944 - 1949

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    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Paris After the Liberation: 1944 - 1949.pdf | Language: ENGLISH
    Antony Beevor(Author)

    Book details


Antony Beevor's Paris After Liberation: 1944-1949 is a remarkable historical account of the chaos and uncertainty that followed the liberation of Paris in August, 1944

'A beautifully written book about a vast tapestry of military, political and social upheaval. Remarkably well-researched, wise, balanced, very funny at times . . . I was a witness to events in Paris in the first desperate, glorious, mad weeks, and this is just how it was'
Dirk Bogarde

Post-liberation Paris: an epoch charged with political and conflicting emotions. Liberation was greeted with joy but marked by recriminations and the trauma of purges. The feverish intellectual arguments of the young took place amidst the mundane reality of hunger and fuel shortages. This is a thrilling, unsurpassed account of the drama and upheaval of one of history's most fascinating eras.

'A dashing, multi-dimensional story. This book covers all aspects of life - diplomacy, strategy, rationing, politics and politicking (from Churchill, Pétain's and de Gaulle's point of view), the international theatricals and the tourist invasion, blitzkrieg and Ritzkrieg - to create a lovely tapestry, threaded with facts and figures'
Olivier Todd, Sunday Times

'Absorbing . . . a rich, many-layered account, selecting from official documents, private archives, memoirs and histories with a wonderful lightness of touch, so that the most complex events become clear' Jenny Uglow, Independent on Sunday

Antony Beevor is the renowned author of Stalingrad, which won the Samuel Johnson Prize, the Wolfson Prize for History and the Hawthornden Prize for Literature, and Berlin, which received the first Longman-History Today Trustees' Award. His books have sold nearly four million copies.

A rich and intriguing story which the authors disentangle with great skill (Piers Paul Read Sunday Telegraph)Skilfully balances historical narrative with social analysis, and tempering the appalling with the absurd (Jan Morris Independent)Outstanding. Enormously enjoyable to read - exciting, lively, funny, and admirably tolerant and objective in its opinions. It is hard to see how it could have been better done (Philip Ziegler Daily Telegraph)Held me gripped by every page and I was impatient at any interruption. The details of this book are spellbinding, often frightening and sometimes funny (Alec Guinness Daily Mail)This book, like the city it discusses, oscillates satisfyingly between blunt history and roistering gossip (Frank Delaney Sunday Express)To understand France today you should read this book about France yesterday . . . a wonderfully enjoyable picture. It is compulsive reading (Mark Bonham-Carter Evening Standard)There is hardly any aspect of French life during that period which the authors do not explore, always with compelling liveliness and omniverous zeal. . . I shall return gratefully to it again and again (Alistair Horne The European)A perceptive portrait of Paris in its heyday (J. G. Ballard The Times)A beautifully written book about a vast tapestry of military, political and social upheaval. Remarkably well-researched, wise, balanced, very funny at times . . . I was a witness to events in Paris in the first desperate, glorious, mad weeks, and this is just how it was (Dirk Bogarde)A dashing, multi-dimensional story. This book covers all aspects of life - diplomacy, strategy, rationing, politics and politicking (from Churchill, Pétain's and de Gaulle's point of view), the international theatricals and the tourist invasion, blitzkrieg and Ritzkrieg - to create a lovely tapestry, threaded with facts and figures (Olivier Todd Sunday Times)Absorbing . . . a rich, many-layered account, selecting from official documents, private archives, memoirs and histories with a wonderful lightness of touch, so that the most complex events become clear (Jenny Uglow Independent on Sunday)

4.2 (9180)
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Book details

  • PDF | 448 pages
  • Antony Beevor(Author)
  • Penguin; New Ed edition (4 Oct. 2007)
  • English
  • 3
  • History

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Review Text

  • By Funguslava on 20 January 2012

    This is a fascinating account of France on a knife edge as it tries to come to terms with the aftermath of the occupation and re-establish its shattered economy and democracy. With the war ended the glue which held together the politically disparate elements of the Resistance is dissolved, freedom fighters have to find common ground with collaborators and everyone has to try to rebuild the country against the background of British, American and Russian interference with the ever-present threats of communist revolution or fascist dictatorship lurking in the background. Modern France could have turned out to be very different to the country we now know.The story is told largely through the eyes of socialites, diplomats and the emerging group of left-bank, left-wing intellectuals who both shape and are shaped by events. Although this range of sources seems limited, the authors successfully use it to produce a framework which clearly sets out the events of the period and goes a long way to explaining the attitudes of the society which emerges. Even if one sometimes wishes that the voices and experiences of ordinary Parisians were more to the fore, this book is a very readable introduction to how France reinvented itself.

  • By Mr. Jeffrey Sutton on 4 September 2017

    Nobody writes like Antony Beevor. Well researched and the characters are bought to life by the author. The internecine warfare by factions of the French population are incredible to read about. Great book

  • By Duncan Evans on 8 March 2017

    Dull by Anthony Beevor's standards - not sure how much of it he wrote!

  • By Bridgewoman on 11 March 2017

    Superb detail, not only covers Paris and France but the shaping of Europe post 1944.

  • By John Spence on 15 June 2017

    The book was every thing as promised with prompt delivery

  • By Les Parry on 9 July 2013

    This is the fourth book I have read by Antony Beevor all of which have been about the second world war and its aftermath. It has the usual copious amount of detail with many surprising facts coming to light following what is obviously a well researched project. I find the author's style of writing suits me and his ability to put across complicated issues in a very succinct way makes for an easy read. If I had any criticism it would be directed at the heavy emphasis he places on the Paris intellectuals, Satre, DeBeauvoir, Aragon etc., who were undoubtedly influential in shaping post war Paris but I would have liked to have read more about how ordinary folk coped, felt and went about their daily lives. This is an important book and should be read by anyone wanting to know how the French started to rebuild their world.


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